HP To Acquire Analytics Specialist Vertica

This sign welcomes visitors to the headquarter...

Image via Wikipedia

By Ramy Ghaly

The buyout will help HP counter IBM’s recent acquisition of Netezza as analytics sector heats up.


Hewlett-Packard said Monday it agreed to acquire Vertica, a privately-held developer of software that lets businesses analyze and interpret information stored in enterprise databases. The move should help HP keep pace with rival IBM, which recently bolstered its analytics portfolio with the buyout of Netezza.

HP officials said the deal will help enterprise customers cope with vastly increasing amounts of information coming into their organizations—through the Web, mobile phones, smart devices, and other sources.

IBM enhanced its analytics portfolio late last year with the $1.7 billion acquisition of Netezza, which bundles analytics software with specialized hardware.

HP said it expects the deal to close in the second quarter.

Read More “Information Week” Via ctrl-News

Why Watson and SPSS Are IBM’s Big Data Yin and Yang?

SPSS

Image via Wikipedia

By Ramy Ghaly March 02, 2011

However, the promise of this holistic data environment doesn’t stop with IBM.

As I reported in a recent post explaining the limits of Watson as a machine-learning platform, its ability to process and answer questions based on natural language is a big deal, but the system as currently comprised is largely relegated to the realm of answering specific questions based on the very specific data loaded into it. However, thanks to a $14 billion investment in analytics acquisitions over the past several years, IBM has a robust portfolio products with which to complement Watson’s impressive capabilities. According to IBM VP of Predictive Analytics Deepak Advani, SPSS — the predictive piece of IBM’s analytics puzzle, which it bought for $1.2 billion in 2009 — might just be Watson’s ideal mate.

The next step is determining the best treatment plan, and that’s where Watson comes in.

Asked a question about the best-possible treatment plan for that particular patient, given the patient’s particular background, Watson could scour its database to suggest a plan, or plans, for the doctor to consider.

Read the full article in “The New York Times” Via ctrl-News