Does Social Media Sets “New World Order” in Building Revolutions Throughout the Middle East?

The Suez Canal crosses the Suez isthmus

Image via Wikipedia

BY consultramy

While the uprising started in Tunisia requesting from a long dictator to step down, Egypt is following suite of the recent Tunisian’s Jasmine Revolution seeking reform, freedom, and respect by using social media to organize, communicate, and express their feelings not only to the world, but to say to their dictators “this is the end of your rule, and now is our time to make the change weather you like it or not”.

The young catalysts of Twitter, Facebook, and social media are behind the driving force of the revolution not only in Tunisia and Egypt, but also in Jordan and Yemen where the role of social media has proven a new world order in digital social communications to bring dawn totalitarian regimes all over the Middle East. Nonstop-able young embryonic youth, the educated elite of the Arab world are speaking out seeking freedom. Yes, freedom is a high commodity especially in the Arab world where no real democracies exists; yet decades of totalitarian regimes that took the power of their people and turned them into modern slaves. Moreover, the blocked elite of Egypt are speaking out after thirty years of unprecedented selfish rule that stole their dignities by keeping them away from engaging in decision making, take responsibilities of their future are now fighting for their pride in setting the road map to gain freedom, the right to speak out, needless to say, gain respect by re-writing history that makes them proud citizens of their forced change to set a better example not only to Egypt, but to other dictators in the Middle East and the world. Now, social media set fear in dictatorships throughout the Arab world where Egypt’s dictatorships shut down all social networks and communications to put more pressure on the young youth to stop their uprising, but that not only turned against the totalitarian regime, instead, it sparked more anger and gave the youth more reason not to give up that easily; yet embrace the fight for freedom to the end while Mr. Mubarak is witnessing his last moments of the 30 years old rule.

Going social in the digital world is building a new world order by driving change and bringing down dictators at least in the Arab world. The young blocked elite of Egypt are seeking change from regime reform, free elections, and the ability to choose their own leaders, to requesting their basic civil rights to be heard and respected; yet achieving it is even more challenging when chaos takes over in the streets and sets a whole new ball game. Social media is playing a vital role to make change possible and give these young rebels a tool that it was unprecedented before having the ability to bring down dictators and set a new world order in social digital communications.

Important facts about Egypt according to CIA FactBook‘s latest figures: 2010

Population: 80 Million

Median age: 24 years

GDP: Approximately $216.8 billion (2009)

Per capita income: $6,200 (GDP/year-PPP 2010)

Unemployment: 9.7% (est.)

Poverty: 40%

Strategic interests to the world:

  • Israeli/Egyptian Peace Treaty signed In 1979.
  • It is estimated that 10 percent of the global crude oil demand passes through the Suez Canal.
  • The biggest population in the Middle East
  • Egypt receives nearly $2-$3 billion in aid per year from the United States.
  • Egypt holds ancient treasures and artifacts.
  • The Pyramids are one of the top wonders of the world.
  • A global destination for tourists making it one of the top tourist markets in the world.

Popular Hash Tags used for the “uprising in Egypt” on Twitter:

#liberation technology

#social freedom

#twitter revolution

#SM revolution

#Egypt

#jan25

#freedom

#Tahrir

#Cairo

#reform

#protest

#democracy

#support

#liberty

#civil liberty

#uprising

#Mona Altahawy

Latest Sentiment analysis of Egypt’s uprising since it started six days ago on January 25, 2011

Link here: Egypt’s Uprising Sentiment Analysis

About the Author:

Ramy Ghaly is a Marketing Strategist with more than ten years in international markets experience. He held professional and managerial positions in varicose global markets in various industries ranging from retail, wholesale, consumer goods, to technology product management with concentration in channel development. In addition, He holds a degree in International Marketing Management with a minor in International Relations and Middle Eastern studies from Daytona State College. He is interested in social media developments, next generation search technologies, semantic search engines, and text analytics; needless to say, strategies in geopolitics, Middle Eastern Studies, and Environmental factors that affect global business growth are general interests that keen to always monitor and encourage writing about.

Advertisements

What are the most challenging issues in Sentiment Analysis(opinion mining)?

A Twitter tweet

Image via Wikipedia

Ramy Ghaly January 28, 2011

Hossein Said:

Opinion Mining/Sentiment Analysis is a somewhat recent subtask of Natural Language processing.Some compare it to text classification,some take a more deep stance towards it. What do you think about the most challenging issues in Sentiment Analysis(opinion mining)? Can you name a few?

Hightechrider Said:

The key challenges for sentiment analysis are:-

1) Named Entity Recognition – What is the person actually talking about, e.g. is 300 Spartans a group of Greeks or a movie?

2) Anaphora Resolution – the problem of resolving what a pronoun, or a noun phrase refers to. “We watched the movie and went to dinner; it was awful.” What does “It” refer to?

3) Parsing – What is the subject and object of the sentence, which one does the verb and/or adjective actually refer to?

4) Sarcasm – If you don’t know the author you have no idea whether ‘bad’ means bad or good.

5) Twitter – abbreviations, lack of capitals, poor spelling, poor punctuation, poor grammar, …

 

ealdent Said:

I agree with Hightechrider that those are areas where Sentiment Analysis accuracy can see improvement. I would also add that sentiment analysis tends to be done on closed-domain text for the most part. Attempts to do it on open domain text usually winds up having very bad accuracy/F1 measure/what have you or else it is pseudo-open-domain because it only looks at certain grammatical constructions. So I would say topic-sensitive sentiment analysis that can identify context and make decisions based on that is an exciting area for research (and industry products).

I’d also expand his 5th point from Twitter to other social media sites (e.g. Facebook, Youtube), where short, ungrammatical utterances are commonplace.

 

Skarab Said:

I think the answer is the language complexity, mistakes in grammar, and spelling. There is vast of ways people expresses there opinions, e.g., sarcasms could be wrongly interpreted as extremely positive sentiment.

 

What do you think? Do you agree? Would you like to ask a question and get an answer? Try out: Q&A for professional and enthusiast programmers